Happy Earth Day Google Doodle Completely Overanalyzed Research Report

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Today’s Google Doodle is one with five different Doodles in it, so of course I refreshed Google at least twenty times in order to get all five.

Just saying.

They’re all really, really pretty. I love them. This is possibly the prettiest Earth Day Doodle.

I really loved 2014, even though it’s not the flashiest or most complicated Doodle. It’s quite simple, but it is still my favorite for some reason.

2009 is really pretty, and I enjoy the land and sea approach. Also, it takes me back to that time of the serif with the Google logo. Ah, memories.

And then there’s 2011, which is animated and interactive and literally everything I could’ve ever asked for except it’s tiny. So small. I wish it were bigger.

And of course, there’s 2013. Which isn’t the prettiest Doodle, but the concept is to die for, and it kept me entertained throughout this long, long post.

Not that I hated writing this post. I loved it. I just get distracted and bored easily.

Also, I wrote pretty much everything below this before writing the stuff up top, so it is not chronologically arranged. Which is why I sound like a credits speech.

Anyways, what I’ve gathered so far from my little experiment is that the forest and red fox Doodle shows up the most, and the grassland and elephant Doodle shows up second most. Also, even though the tundra and polar bear is the featured Doodle, it doesn’t show up all that most, and the aquatic, coral reef, and octopus Doodle usually shows up after the desert and tortoise Doodle.

Warning: Not actual results of super scientific experiment below.

It may be time for me to publish my findings. I like researching things.

I went to the Google page. It was on desert and tortoise. I wrote that down. I refreshed the page. I wrote down the next Doodle. I repeated this for 100 refreshes. Yes, one hundred. I am nothing if not thorough.

The following were my results:

  1. Desert and tortoise
  2. Tundra and polar bear
  3. Tundra and polar bear
  4. Desert and tortoise
  5. Grassland and elephant
  6. Grassland and elephant
  7. Aquatic, coral reef, and octopus
  8. Tundra and polar bear
  9. Desert and tortoise
  10. Tundra and polar bear
  11. Grassland and elephant
  12. Grassland and elephant
  13. Desert and tortoise
  14. Desert and tortoise
  15. Desert and tortoise
  16. Tundra and polar bear
  17. Forest and red fox
  18. Desert and tortoise
  19. Forest and red fox
  20. Tundra and polar bear
  21. Tundra and polar bear
  22. Grassland and elephant
  23. Desert and tortoise
  24. Forest and red fox
  25. Grassland and elephant
  26. Tundra and polar bear
  27. Grassland and elephant
  28. Desert and tortoise
  29. Grassland and elephant
  30. Forest and red fox
  31. Tundra and polar bear
  32. Aquatic, coral reef, and octopus
  33. Aquatic, coral reef, and octopus
  34. Aquatic, coral reef, and octopus
  35. Desert and tortoise
  36. Aquatic, coral reef, and octopus
  37. Aquatic, coral reef, and octopus
  38. Grassland and elephant
  39. Grassland and elephant
  40. Grassland and elephant
  41. Grassland and elephant
  42. Grassland and elephant
  43. Aquatic, coral reef, and octopus
  44. Grassland and elephant
  45. Tundra and polar bear
  46. Desert and tortoise
  47. Desert and tortoise
  48. Grassland and elephant
  49. Grassland and elephant
  50. Forest and red fox
  51. Aquatic, coral reef, and octopus
  52. Grassland and elephant
  53. Forest and red fox
  54. Grassland and elephant
  55. Grassland and elephant
  56. Aquatic, coral reef, and octopus
  57. Aquatic, coral reef, and octopus
  58. Forest and red fox
  59. Tundra and polar bear
  60. Desert and tortoise
  61. Grassland and elephant
  62. Tundra and polar bear
  63. Tundra and polar bear
  64. Tundra and polar bear
  65. Grassland and elephant
  66. Grassland and elephant
  67. Grassland and elephant
  68. Tundra and polar bear
  69. Desert and tortoise
  70. Desert and tortoise
  71. Tundra and polar bear
  72. Aquatic, coral reef, and octopus
  73. Desert and tortoise
  74. Grassland and elephant
  75. Aquatic, coral reef, and octopus
  76. Grassland and elephant
  77. Forest and red fox
  78. Aquatic, coral reef, and octopus
  79. Desert and tortoise
  80. Aquatic, coral reef, and octopus
  81. Forest and red fox
  82. Aquatic, coral reef, and octopus
  83. Aquatic, coral reef, and octopus
  84. Aquatic, coral reef, and octopus
  85. Desert and tortoise
  86. Desert and tortoise
  87. Forest and red fox
  88. Desert and tortoise
  89. Tundra and polar bear
  90. Aquatic, coral reef, and octopus
  91. Aquatic, coral reef, and octopus
  92. Aquatic, coral reef, and octopus
  93. Tundra and polar bear
  94. Tundra and polar bear
  95. Aquatic, coral reef, and octopus
  96. Forest and red fox
  97. Desert and tortoise
  98. Aquatic, coral reef, and octopus
  99. Tundra and polar bear
  100. Tundra and polar bear

The Doodles in the order they first show up are: desert and tortoise at 1, tundra and polar bear at 2, grassland and elephant at 5, aquatic, coral reef, and octopus at 7, and forest and red fox at 17.

And here’s Mr. Charty McChartinson so you know what that boils down to, number wise:

Number of times forest and red fox appeared 11
Number of times grassland and elephant appeared  25
Number of times tundra and polar bear appeared  21
Number of times aquatic, coral reef, and octopus appeared  22
Number of times desert and tortoise appeared  21

So, conclusion time. From this chart, we can see that the most common was grassland and elephant, followed by aquatic, coral reef, and octopus, then tundra and polar bear and desert and tortoise, and finally forest and red fox.

And now here’s another chart, which tells you the amount of times one Doodle is followed by another.

Followed by forest and red fox Followed by grassland and elephant Followed by tundra and polar bear Followed by aquatic, coral reef, and octopus Followed by desert and tortoise
Forest and red fox 0 2 3 3 3
Grassland and elephant 4 8 4 4 3
Tundra and polar bear 1 4 6 4 5
Aquatic, coral reef, and octopus 3 4 3 7 4
Desert and tortoise 3 5 5 3 5

Forest and red fox is the only Doodle that does not repeat itself, while grassland and elephant repeats itself the most, followed by aquatic, coral reef, and octopus, tundra and polar bear, and desert and tortoise.

Strangely enough, these four follow each other in a pattern of subtract one each time. However, this pattern does not apply to forest and red fox.

Meanwhile, most of these numbers are quite close to each other, the “outliers” being 0, 7, and 8. These three numbers are all about repeat Doodles, so excluding repeat Doodles, there seems to be a random pattern between Doodles.

A few more miscellaneous bits of information: tundra and polar bear is more likely to double, while grassland and elephant is more likely to sandwich and/or imitate the number of repeats before it. The numbers associated with forest and red fox are usually prime or divisible by two. Desert and tortoise never repeats right after another repeat, and aquatic, coral reef, and octopus has a section of near-symmetry from 78 to 98.

Now that I’ve overanalyzed everything, enjoy your Google Doodle.

P.S. Images belong to their rightful owners.

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